African American

Citizen: An American Lyric
$8.91
Description

* Finalist for the National Book Award in Poetry *
* Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry * Finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in Criticism * Winner of the NAACP Image Award * Winner of the L.A. Times Book Prize * Winner of the PEN Open Book Award *

ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR:
The New Yorker, Boston Globe, The Atlantic, BuzzFeed, NPR. Los Angeles Times, Publishers Weekly, Slate, Time Out New York, Vulture, Refinery 29, and many more . . .

A provocative meditation on race, Claudia Rankine's long-awaited follow up to her groundbreaking book Don't Let Me Be Lonely: An American Lyric.

Claudia Rankine's bold new book recounts mounting racial aggressions in ongoing encounters in twenty-first-century daily life and in the media. Some of these encounters are slights, seeming slips of the tongue, and some are intentional offensives in the classroom, at the supermarket, at home, on the tennis court with Serena Williams and the soccer field with Zinedine Zidane, online, on TV-everywhere, all the time. The accumulative stresses come to bear on a person's ability to speak, perform, and stay alive. Our addressability is tied to the state of our belonging, Rankine argues, as are our assumptions and expectations of citizenship. In essay, image, and poetry, Citizen is a powerful testament to the individual and collective effects of racism in our contemporary, often named "post-race" society.

ISBN
9781555976903
By
Rankine, Claudia
Publisher
Graywolf Press
Item Condition
Used, Like New
About This Product
Excellent, unmarked copy with little wear and tight binding. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
708764
Location
B
Americanah
$5.08
Description

The bestselling novel--and one of Barack Obama's summer reading picks--from the award-winning author of We Should All Be Feminists and Dear Ijeawele.

"From one of the world's great contemporary writers comes the story of two Nigerians making their way in the U.S. and the UK, raising universal questions of race and belonging, the overseas experience for the African diaspora, and the search for identity and a home." --Barack Obama

Nominated as one of America's best-loved novels by PBS's The Great American Read

Ifemelu and Obinze are young and in love when they depart military-ruled Nigeria for the West. Beautiful, self-assured Ifemelu heads for America, where despite her academic success, she is forced to grapple with what it means to be black for the first time. Quiet, thoughtful Obinze had hoped to join her, but with post-9/11 America closed to him, he instead plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London. Fifteen years later, they reunite in a newly democratic Nigeria, and reignite their passion--for each other and for their homeland.

ISBN
9780307455925
By
Adichie, Chimamanda Ngozi
Publisher
Anchor
Item Condition
Used, Very Good
About This Product
Clean, unmarked copy with some edge wear. Good binding. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
743774
Location
L
Sing, Unburied, Sing: A Novel
$6.27
Description
WINNER of the NATIONAL BOOK AWARD and A NEW YORK TIMES TOP 10 BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR

A finalist for the Kirkus Prize, Andrew Carnegie Medal, Aspen Words Literary Prize, and a New York Times bestseller, this majestic, stirring, and widely praised novel from two-time National Book Award winner Jesmyn Ward, the story of a family on a journey through rural Mississippi, is a "tour de force" (O, the Oprah Magazine) and a timeless work of fiction that is destined to become a classic.

Jesmyn Ward's historic second National Book Award-winner is "perfectly poised for the moment" (The New York Times), an intimate portrait of three generations of a family and an epic tale of hope and struggle. "Ward's writing throbs with life, grief, and love... this book is the kind that makes you ache to return to it" (Buzzfeed).

Jojo is thirteen years old and trying to understand what it means to be a man. He doesn't lack in fathers to study, chief among them his Black grandfather, Pop. But there are other men who complicate his understanding: his absent White father, Michael, who is being released from prison; his absent White grandfather, Big Joseph, who won't acknowledge his existence; and the memories of his dead uncle, Given, who died as a teenager.

His mother, Leonie, is an inconsistent presence in his and his toddler sister's lives. She is an imperfect mother in constant conflict with herself and those around her. She is Black and her children's father is White. She wants to be a better mother but can't put her children above her own needs, especially her drug use. Simultaneously tormented and comforted by visions of her dead brother, which only come to her when she's high, Leonie is embattled in ways that reflect the brutal reality of her circumstances.

When the children's father is released from prison, Leonie packs her kids and a friend into her car and drives north to the heart of Mississippi and Parchman Farm, the State Penitentiary. At Parchman, there is another thirteen-year-old boy, the ghost of a dead inmate who carries all of the ugly history of the South with him in his wandering. He too has something to teach Jojo about fathers and sons, about legacies, about violence, about love.

Rich with Ward's distinctive, lyrical language, Sing, Unburied, Sing is a majestic and unforgettable family story and "an odyssey through rural Mississippi's past and present" (The Philadelphia Inquirer).

ISBN
9781501126079
By
Ward, Jesmyn
Publisher
Scribner
Item Condition
Used, Good
About This Product
Moderate edge wear. Binding good. May have marking in text. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We sometimes source from libraries. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
707755
Location
B
The Sellout: A Novel
$4.85
Description

Winner of the Man Booker Prize

Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award in Fiction

Winner of the John Dos Passos Prize for Literature

New York Times Bestseller

Los Angeles Times Bestseller

Named One of the 10 Best Books of the Year by The New York Times Book Review

Named a Best Book of the Year by Newsweek, The Denver Post, BuzzFeed, Kirkus Reviews, and Publishers Weekly

Named a "Must-Read" by Flavorwire and New York Magazine's "Vulture" Blog

A biting satire about a young man's isolated upbringing and the race trial that sends him to the Supreme Court, Paul Beatty's The Sellout showcases a comic genius at the top of his game. It challenges the sacred tenets of the United States Constitution, urban life, the civil rights movement, the father-son relationship, and the holy grail of racial equality--the black Chinese restaurant.

Born in the "agrarian ghetto" of Dickens--on the southern outskirts of Los Angeles--the narrator of The Sellout resigns himself to the fate of lower-middle-class Californians: "I'd die in the same bedroom I'd grown up in, looking up at the cracks in the stucco ceiling that've been there since '68 quake." Raised by a single father, a controversial sociologist, he spent his childhood as the subject in racially charged psychological studies. He is led to believe that his father's pioneering work will result in a memoir that will solve his family's financial woes. But when his father is killed in a police shoot-out, he realizes there never was a memoir. All that's left is the bill for a drive-thru funeral.

Fueled by this deceit and the general disrepair of his hometown, the narrator sets out to right another wrong: Dickens has literally been removed from the map to save California from further embarrassment. Enlisting the help of the town's most famous resident--the last surviving Little Rascal, Hominy Jenkins--he initiates the most outrageous action conceivable: reinstating slavery and segregating the local high school, which lands him in the Supreme Court.

ISBN
9781250083258
By
Beatty, Paul
Publisher
Picador
Item Condition
Used, Like New
About This Product
Excellent, unmarked copy with little wear and tight binding. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
741488
Location
D
Conjuring, Black Women, Fiction, and Literary Tradition (Everywoman: Studies in History, Literature, and Culture)
$5.77
ISBN
9780253203601
By
Spillers, Hortense J
Publisher
Indiana University Press
Item Condition
Used, Good
About This Product
Moderate edge wear. Binding good. May have marking in text. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We sometimes source from libraries. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
708910
Location
B
The Last Days of Ptolemy Grey
$4.87
Description
A major literary event-nothing short of a "tour de force" (New York Times) by the acclaimed and beloved author.

Marooned in an apartment that overflows with mementos from the past, 91-year-old Ptolemy Grey is all but forgotten by his family and the world. But when an unexpected opportunity arrives, everything changes for Ptolemy in ways as shocking and unanticipated as they are poignant and profound.

ISBN
9781594485503
By
Mosley, Walter
Publisher
Riverhead Books
Item Condition
Used, Very Good
About This Product
Clean, unmarked copy with some edge wear. Good binding. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
741189
Location
D
Quilting: Poems 1987-1990 (American Poets Continuum Series, Vol. 21)
$4.96
Description
Brilliantly honed language, sharp rhythms and striking syntax empower Lucille Clifton's personal and artistic odyssey. Hers is poetry of birth, death, children, community, history, sexuality and spirituality, and she addresses these themes with passion, humor, anger and spiritual awe.
ISBN
9780918526816
By
Clifton, Lucille
Publisher
BOA Editions Ltd.
Item Condition
Used, Very Good
About This Product
Clean, unmarked copy with some edge wear. Good binding. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
742531
Location
D
Cane (New Edition)
$5.65
Description
First published in 1923, Jean Toomer s Cane is an innovative literary work part drama, part poetry, part fiction powerfully evoking black life in the South. Rich in imagery, Toomer s impressionistic, sometimes surrealistic sketches of Southern rural and urban life are permeated by visions of smoke, sugarcane, dusk, and fire; the northern world is pictured as a harsher reality of asphalt streets. This iconic work of American literature is published with a new afterword by Rudolph Byrd of Emory University and Henry Louis Gates Jr. of Harvard University, who provide groundbreaking biographical information on Toomer, place his writing within the context of American modernism and the Harlem Renaissance, and examine his shifting claims about his own race and his pioneering critique of race as a scientific or biological concept."
ISBN
9780871402103
By
Toomer, Jean
Publisher
Liveright
Item Condition
Used, Good
About This Product
Moderate edge wear. Binding good. May have marking in text. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We sometimes source from libraries. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
708254
Location
B
Go Tell It on the Mountain (Vintage International)
$6.32
Description
"Mountain," Baldwin said, "is the book I had to write if I was ever going to write anything else." Go Tell It on the Mountain, originally published in 1953, is Baldwin's first major work, a novel that has established itself as an American classic. With lyrical precision, psychological directness, resonating symbolic power, and a rage that is at once unrelenting and compassionate, Baldwin chronicles a fourteen-year-old boy's discovery one Saturday in March of 1935 of the terms of his identity as the stepson of the minister of a Pentecostal storefront church in Harlem. Baldwin's rendering of his protagonist's spiritual, sexual, and moral struggle toward self-invention opened new possibilities in the American language and in the way Americans understand themselves.
ISBN
9780375701870
By
Baldwin, James
Publisher
Vintage
Item Condition
Used, Very Good
About This Product
Clean, unmarked copy with some edge wear. Good binding. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
743759
Location
L
Passing
$5.65
Description

In Larsen's second novel, "Passing," first published in 1929, the author revisits the theme of her first novel "Quicksand," that being the struggle for racial identity by children of mixed-race. The novel details the lives of two childhood friends, Clare Kendry and Irene Redfield, both of whom are of mixed African and European ancestry and are "passing" as whites. The novel picks up in the lives of the two as they later reunite in adulthood. An ambiguous relation develops between the two as they share a fascination for how each other's lives have transpired since they last knew each other. Larsen's work has been lauded for its exploration of race, gender, class, and sexuality amongst African Americans in early part of the 20th century. Now considered as a major figure of the Harlem Renaissance, Larsen's writing gives a firsthand insight into the struggle of African Americans during this era. This edition is printed on premium acid-free paper.

ISBN
9781420956139
By
Larsen, Nella
Publisher
Digireads.com Publishing
Item Condition
Used, Good
About This Product
Moderate edge wear. Binding good. May have marking in text. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We sometimes source from libraries. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
707843
Location
B
Hum (ALA Notable Books for Adults)
$5.10
Description
2014 Notable Book Award from the American Library Association
2013 Silver IndieFab Award Winner
2013 NAACP Image Award Nominee
2013 ForeWord Book of the Year Award Finalist
2013 The Boston Globe's Best Books of 2013 List
2012 Beatrice Hawley Award

"Linguistically acrobatic [and] beautifully crafted. . . [Jamaal May's] poems, exquisitely balanced by a sharp intelligence mixed with earnestness, makes his debut a marvel." --Publishers Weekly

"The elegant and laconic intelligence in these poems, their skepticism and bent humor and deliberately anti-Romantic stance toward experience are completely refreshing. After so much contemporary writing that seems all flash, no mind and no heart, these poems show how close observation of the world and a gift for plain-spoken, but eloquent speech, can give to poetry both dignity and largeness of purpose, and do it in an idiom that is pitch perfect to emotional nuance and fine intellectual distinctions. Hard-headed and tough-minded, Hum is the epitome of what Frost meant by 'a fresh look and a fresh listen.'" --Tom Sleigh

"Jamaal May's debut collection, Hum, is concerned with what's beneath the surfaces of things--the unseen that eats away at us or does the work of sustaining us. Reading these poems, I was reminded of Ellison's 'lower frequencies, ' a voice speaking for us all. May has a fine ear, acutely attuned to the sonic textures of everyday experience. And Hum--a meditation on the machinery of living, an extended ode to sound and silence--is a compelling debut." --Natasha Trethewey

"In his percussive debut collection Hum, Jamaal May offers a salve for our phobias and restores the sublime to the urban landscape. Whether you need a friend to confide in, a healer to go to, or a tour guide to take you there, look no further. That low hum you hear are these poems, emanating both wisdom and swagger." --A. Van Jordan

From "Mechanophobia: Fear of Machines":

There is no work left for the husks.
Automated welders like us,
your line replacements, can't expect
sympathy after our bright
arms of cable rust over. So come

collect us for scrap, grind us up
in the mouth of one of us.
Let your hand pry at the access
panel with the edge of a knife,
silencing the motor and thrum.


ISBN
9781938584022
By
May, Jamaal
Publisher
Alice James Books
Item Condition
Used, Like New
About This Product
Excellent, unmarked copy with little wear and tight binding. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
741334
Location
D
B Jenkins (Refiguring American Music)
$16.35
Description
The fourth collection of poetry from the literary and cultural critic Fred Moten, B Jenkins is named after the poet's mother, who passed away in 2000. It is both an elegy and an inquiry into many of the themes that Moten has explored throughout his career: language, music, performance, improvisation, and the black radical aesthetic and political tradition. In Moten's verse, the arts, scholarship, and activism intertwine. Cadences echo from his mother's Arkansas home through African American history and avant-garde jazz riffs. Formal innovations suggest the ways that words, sounds, and music give way to one another.

The first and last poems in the collection are explicitly devoted to Moten's mother; the others relate more obliquely to her life and legacy. They invoke performers, writers, artists, and thinkers including not only James Baldwin, Roland Barthes, Frederick Douglass, Billie Holiday, Audre Lorde, Charlie Parker, and Cecil Taylor, but also contemporary scholars of race, affect, and queer theory. The book concludes with an interview conducted by Charles Henry Rowell, the editor of the journal Callaloo. Rowell elicits Moten's thoughts on the relation of his poetry to theory, music, and African American vernacular culture.

ISBN
9780822346968
By
Moten, Fred
Publisher
Duke University Press
Item Condition
Used, Good
About This Product
Moderate edge wear. Binding good. May have marking in text. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We sometimes source from libraries. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
774994
Location
L