Products

Eye of the Albatross: Views of the Endangered Sea
$10.40
Description
With one of the planet's most alluring birds as his guide, America's foremost chronicler of marine life captures the embattled ocean world.
On a wingspan of up to eleven feet, the albatross can travel as far as five thousand miles without stopping. But until recently, little was known about the albatross's far-flung flights. Now, award-winning author Carl Safina takes us to the higher latitudes to explain what marine animals like the albatross can tell us about the health of our oceans.
"Eye of the Albatross" takes us soaring to locales where whales, sea turtles, penguins, and shearwaters flourish in their own quotidian rhythms. Safina's guide and inspiration is a bird he calls Amelia, whose life he portrays in fascinating detail. Interwoven with recollections of whalers and famous explorers, "Eye of the Albatross" probes the unmistakable environmental impact of the encounters between man and marine life. Though no place remains untouched by us, fishing restrictions and habitat protection have signaled positive gains for albatrosses and several other marine animals. Safina's portrait combines the authority and drama of Rachel Carson with Peter Matthiessen's perceptive skill. The result is a transforming ride to the ends of the Earth and an urgent appeal to preserve the wild oceans while there is still time.
ISBN
9780805062281
By
Safina, Carl
Publisher
Henry Holt and Co.
Item Condition
Used, Like New
About This Product
Excellent, unmarked copy with little wear and tight binding. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
1118560
Location
F
Down from the Mountain: The Life and Death of a Grizzly Bear
$25.00
Description
"Andrews' wonderful Down from the Mountain is deeply informed by personal experience and made all the stronger by his compassion and measured thoughts... Welcome and impressive work." --Barry Lopez

Winner of the Banff Mountain Book Competition's Mountain Environment & Natural History Award

The story of a grizzly bear named Millie: her life, death, and cubs, and what they reveal about the changing character of the American West


The grizzly is one of North America's few remaining large predators. Their range is diminished, but they're spreading across the West again. Descending into valleys where once they were king, bears find the landscape they'd known for eons utterly changed by the new most dominant animal: humans. As the grizzlies approach, the people of the region are wary, at best, of their return.

In searing detail, award-winning writer, Montana rancher, and conservationist Bryce Andrews tells us about one such grizzly. Millie is a typical mother: strong, cunning, fiercely protective of her cubs. But raising those cubs--a challenging task in the best of times--becomes ever harder as the mountains change, the climate warms and people crowd the valleys. There are obvious dangers, like poachers, and subtle ones as well, like the corn field that draws her out of the foothills and sets her on a path toward trouble and ruin.

That trouble is where Bryce's story intersects with Millie's. It is the heart of Down from the Mountain, a singular drama evoking a much larger one: an entangled, bloody collision between two species in the modern-day West, where the shrinking wilds force man and bear into ever closer proximity.
ISBN
9781328972453
By
Andrews, Bryce
Publisher
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Item Condition
New
About This Product
New from publisher.
Item SKU
9781328972453
Location
Nature
Buzz: The Nature and Necessity of Bees
$16.99
Description
As seen on PBS's American Spring LIVE, the award-winning author of The Triumph of Seeds and Feathers presents a natural and cultural history of bees: the buzzing wee beasties that make the world go round.
Bees are like oxygen: ubiquitous, essential, and, for the most part, unseen. While we might overlook them, they lie at the heart of relationships that bind the human and natural worlds. In Buzz, the beloved Thor Hanson takes us on a journey that begins 125 million years ago, when a wasp first dared to feed pollen to its young. From honeybees and bumbles to lesser-known diggers, miners, leafcutters, and masons, bees have long been central to our harvests, our mythologies, and our very existence. They've given us sweetness and light, the beauty of flowers, and as much as a third of the foodstuffs we eat. And, alarmingly, they are at risk of disappearing.
As informative and enchanting as the waggle dance of a honeybee, Buzz shows us why all bees are wonders to celebrate and protect. Read this book and you'll never overlook them again.
ISBN
9781541699533
By
Hanson, Thor
Publisher
Basic Books
Item Condition
New
About This Product
New from publisher.
Item SKU
9781541699533
Location
Nature
A Polar Affair: Antarctica's Forgotten Hero and the Secret Love Lives of Penguins
$29.95
Description

George Murray Levick was the physician on Robert Falcon Scott's tragic Antarctic expedition of 1910. Marooned for an Antarctic winter, Levick passed the time by becoming the first man to study penguins up close. His findings were so shocking to Victorian morals that they were quickly suppressed and seemingly lost to history.

A century later, Lloyd Spencer Davis rediscovers Levick and his findings during the course of his own scientific adventures in Antarctica. Levick's long-suppressed manuscript reveals not only an incredible survival story, but one that will change our understanding of an entire species.

A Polar Affair reveals the last untold tale from the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration. It is perhaps the greatest of all of those stories--but why was it hidden to begin with? The ever-fascinating and charming penguin holds the key. Moving deftly between both Levick's and Davis's explorations, observations, and comparisons in biology over the course of a century, A Polar Affair reveals cutting-edge findings about ornithology, in which the sex lives of penguins are the jumping-off point for major new insights into the underpinnings of evolutionary biology itself.

ISBN
9781643131252
By
Davis, Lloyd Spencer
Publisher
Pegasus Books
Item Condition
New
About This Product
New from publisher.
Item SKU
9781643131252
Location
Nature
Underland: A Deep Time Journey
$27.95
Description

Hailed as "the great nature writer of this generation" (Wall Street Journal), Robert Macfarlane is the celebrated author of books about the intersections of the human and the natural realms. In Underland, he delivers his masterpiece: an epic exploration of the Earth's underworlds as they exist in myth, literature, memory, and the land itself.

In this highly anticipated sequel to his international bestseller The Old Ways, Macfarlane takes us on an extraordinary journey into our relationship with darkness, burial, and what lies beneath the surface of both place and mind. Traveling through "deep time"--the dizzying expanses of geologic time that stretch away from the present--he moves from the birth of the universe to a post-human future, from the prehistoric art of Norwegian sea caves to the blue depths of the Greenland ice cap, from Bronze Age funeral chambers to the catacomb labyrinth below Paris, and from the underground fungal networks through which trees communicate to a deep-sunk "hiding place" where nuclear waste will be stored for 100,000 years to come. Woven through Macfarlane's own travels are the unforgettable stories of descents into the underland made across history by explorers, artists, cavers, divers, mourners, dreamers, and murderers, all of whom have been drawn for different reasons to seek what Cormac McCarthy calls "the awful darkness within the world."

Global in its geography and written with great lyricism and power, Underland speaks powerfully to our present moment. Taking a deep-time view of our planet, Macfarlane here asks a vital and unsettling question: "Are we being good ancestors to the future Earth?" Underland marks a new turn in Macfarlane's long-term mapping of the relations of landscape and the human heart. From its remarkable opening pages to its deeply moving conclusion, it is a journey into wonder, loss, fear, and hope. At once ancient and urgent, this is a book that will change the way you see the world.

ISBN
9780393242140
By
MacFarlane, Robert
Publisher
W. W. Norton & Company
Item Condition
New
About This Product
New from publisher.
Item SKU
9780393242140
Location
Nature
Heaven's Breath: A Natural History of the Wind (New York Review Books Classics)
$18.95
Description
Wind is everywhere and nowhere. Wind is the circulatory system of the earth, and its nervous system, too. Energy and information flow through it. It brings warmth and water, enriches and strips away the soil, aerates the globe. Wind shapes the lives of animals, humans among them. Trade follows the path of the wind, as empire also does. Wind made the difference in wars between the Greeks and Persians, the Mongols and the Japanese. Wind helped to destroy the Spanish Armada. And wind is no less determining of our inner lives: the föhn, mistral, sirocco, Santa Ana, and other "ill winds" of the world are correlated with disease, suicide, and even murder.

Heaven's Breath is an encyclopedic and enchanting book that opens dazzling new perspectives on history, nature, and humanity.

ISBN
9781681373690
By
Watson, Lyall
Publisher
NYRB Classics
Item Condition
New
About This Product
New from publisher.
Item SKU
9781681373690
Location
Science
How to Give Up Plastic: A Guide to Changing the World, One Plastic Bottle at a Time
$15.00
Description
An accessible guide to the changes we can all make--small and large--to rid our lives of disposable plastic and clean up the world's oceans

How to Give Up Plastic is a straightforward guide to eliminating plastic from your life. Going room by room through your home and workplace, Greenpeace activist Will McCallum teaches you how to spot disposable plastic items and find plastic-free, sustainable alternatives to each one. From carrying a reusable straw, to catching microfibers when you wash your clothes, to throwing plastic-free parties, you'll learn new and intuitive ways to reduce plastic waste. And by arming you with a wealth of facts about global plastic consumption and anecdotes from activists fighting plastic around the world, you'll also learn how to advocate to businesses and leaders in your community and across the country to commit to eliminating disposable plastics for good.

It takes 450 years for a plastic bottle to fully biodegrade, and there are around 12.7 million tons of plastic entering the ocean each year. At our current pace, in the year 2050 there could be more plastic in the oceans than fish, by weight. These are alarming figures, but plastic pollution is an environmental crisis with a solution we can all contribute to.

ISBN
9780143134336
By
McCallum, Will
Publisher
Penguin Books
Item Condition
New
About This Product
New from publisher.
Item SKU
9780143134336
Location
Non-Fiction
Chesapeake Requiem: A Year with the Watermen of Vanishing Tangier Island
$28.99
Description

A brilliant, soulful, and timely portrait of a two-hundred-year-old crabbing community in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay as it faces extinction.

A BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR: Washington Post, NPR, Outside, Smithsonian, Popular Science, Bloomberg, Christian Science Monitor, Chicago Review of Books, Science Friday, and Kirkus

"BEAUTIFUL, HAUNTING AND TRUE." -- Hampton Sides - "GORGEOUS. A TRULY REMARKABLE BOOK." -- Beth Macy - "GRIPPING. FANTASTIC." -- Outside - "CAPTIVATING." -- Washington Post - "POWERFUL." -- Bill McKibben - "VIVID. HARROWING AND MOVING." -- Science - "A MASTERFUL NARRATIVE." -- Christian Science Monitor - "THE BEST NONFICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR." -- Stephen L. Carter/Bloomberg

A Washington Post bestseller - An Indie Next List selection - An NPR All Things Considered and Axios "Book Club" pick

Tangier Island, Virginia, is a community unique on the American landscape. Mapped by John Smith in 1608, settled during the American Revolution, the tiny sliver of mud is home to 470 hardy people who live an isolated and challenging existence, with one foot in the 21st century and another in times long passed. They are separated from their countrymen by the nation's largest estuary, and a twelve-mile boat trip across often tempestuous water--the same water that for generations has made Tangier's fleet of small fishing boats a chief source for the rightly prized Chesapeake Bay blue crab, and has lent the island its claim to fame as the softshell crab capital of the world.

Yet for all of its long history, and despite its tenacity, Tangier is disappearing. The very water that has long sustained it is erasing the island day by day, wave by wave. It has lost two-thirds of its land since 1850, and still its shoreline retreats by fifteen feet a year--meaning this storied place will likely succumb first among U.S. towns to the effects of climate change. Experts reckon that, barring heroic intervention by the federal government, islanders could be forced to abandon their home within twenty-five years. Meanwhile, the graves of their forebears are being sprung open by encroaching tides, and the conservative and deeply religious Tangiermen ponder the end times.

Chesapeake Requiem is an intimate look at the island's past, present and tenuous future, by an acclaimed journalist who spent much of the past two years living among Tangier's people, crabbing and oystering with its watermen, and observing its long traditions and odd ways. What emerges is the poignant tale of a world that has, quite nearly, gone by--and a leading-edge report on the coming fate of countless coastal communities.

ISBN
9780062661395
By
Swift, Earl
Publisher
Dey Street Books
Item Condition
New
About This Product
New from publisher.
Item SKU
9780062661395
Location
History
Mayflies and Stoneflies: Life Histories and Biology: Proceedings of the 5th International Ephemeroptera Conference and the 9th International Plecoptera Conference (Series Entomologica)
$144.22
Description
The papers included in this volume were amongst day running of the conference, and Ms Julia those presented at the 5th International Epheme- Reed, Ms Kim James, Ms Anne Devereaux, roptera Conference and the 9th International Mr Peter Green, Ms Catriona Smith who assist- Plecoptera Conference at the Marysville Hotel, ed them, Mr David Ginn and all the staff at the Marysville Australia from the 18th to the 24th of Marysville Hotel also deserve special thanks for February 1987. The conference was attended by the the superb catering and relaxed atmosphere 62 participants from 21 countries. This was the they created which contributed so much to the frrst time the two conferences had been held conference. together, and the frrst time either had been held in All the papers included in this volume were the southern hemisphere. refereed prior to acceptance, and I would like to The papers included here cover a broad spectrum thank the following referees: Dr J. Davis, of research into the two orders of aquatic insects, Dr L. Barmuta, Dr R. Marchant, Mr T. Doeg, with the emphasis on life histories, which was the Dr P. Bailey, Dr S. Bunn, Dr R. Rowe, Dr R. theme of a joint symposium held during the con- Pearson, Ms C. Yule and Dr P. Suter. Ms Sue ference. The paper by Dr Brittain was presented Mitchell assisted with the typing and Ms Kerrle as a keynote address to that symposium. The Swadling with the proof-reading of the text.
ISBN
9780792302896
Publisher
Springer
Item Condition
Used, Good
About This Product
Moderate edge wear. Binding good. May have marking in text. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We sometimes source from libraries. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
701834
Location
A
The Last River: The Tragic Race for Shangri-la
$5.87
Description
It was the ultimate whitewater adventure on the Mount Everest of rivers, and the biggest challenge of their lives....
October 1998 an American whitewater paddling team traveled deep into the Tsangpo Gorge in Tibet to run the Yarlung Tsangpo, known in paddling circles as the "Everest of rivers." On Day 12 of that trip, the team's ace paddler, one of four kayakers on the river, launched off an eight-foot waterfall and flipped. He and his overturned kayak spilled into the heart of the thunderous "freight training" river and were swept downstream, never to be seen again.
The Last River: The Tragic Race for Shangri-la is a breathtaking account of this ill-fated expedition, a fascinating exploration of what propelled these kayakers to take on the seething big water and perilous Himalayan terrain of the deepest gorge on the planet. This was the magical Shangri-la of legend, a 140-mile-long canyon framed by 25,000-foot snowcapped peaks, a place of unimaginable beauty called Pemako in ancient Buddhist texts that was rumored to contain mammoth waterfalls.
At the close of the twentieth century, an end-to-end descent of the gorge filled the imaginations of some of the best boaters in the world, who saw in the foam and fury of the Tsangpo's rapids the ultimate whitewater challenge. For Wick Walker and Tom McEwan, extreme whitewater pioneers, best friends, and trip leaders, the Tsangpo adventure with Doug Gordon, Olympic medal-winning paddler Jamie McEwan (Tom's brother), and Roger Zbel was the culmination of a twenty-five-year quest. Fueled by narratives of early explorers, Walker and McEwan kept their dream alive and waited until the Chinese government opened the gorge to Westerners.With financial backing from the National Geographic Society, the group was finally good to go in 1998.
Swollen to three times the size they had expected because of record rains and heavy snowmelt, the Tsangpo lived up to its fearsome reputation. On numerous occasions the team questioned whether to continue, but chose to press forward. The Last River probes beyond the extreme sports cliches and looks at the complex personal and intellectual reasons for the seemingly irresistible draw of Tibet's Great River. For Walker, Gordon, Zbel, and the McEwans -- husbands, fathers, friends, and brothers -- the Tsangpo wasn't a run toward death but a celebration of life, adventure, and the thing that tied them to one another -- awe-inspiring rivers. The Last River is also a riveting journey to one of the world's wildest and most alluring places, a thrilling book that invites us into the Himalayas of Jon Krakauer's classic, Into Thin Air, but from a totally new perspective -- on a historic river so remote that only the most hardy and romantic souls attempt to unlock its mysteries.
Visit www.randomhouse.com/features/lastriver
ISBN
9780609606254
By
Balf, Todd
Publisher
Crown
Item Condition
Used, Very Good
About This Product
Clean, unmarked copy with some edge wear. Good binding. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
1119254
Location
F
Courting the Diamond Sow: Kayaking Tibet's Forbidden Tsangpo River (Adventure Press)
$4.99
Description
The harrowing account of the pioneering descent of Tibets Tsangpo River one of modern explorations greatest challenges which ended in tragedy with the death of Olympic Paddler Doug Gordon. A COMPELLING AND DRAMATIC EXPEDITION ACCOUNT set in one of the worlds most beautiful and remote regions. The Tsangpo is one of the last great uncharted rivers in the world. It's the Everest of whitewater, except unlike Everest, it's never been done. -- Arlene Burns, the Washington Post ROMANCE OF THE WORLD'S FORBIDDEN AND SECRET PLACES: Mysterious and sacred, Tibet has fascinated explorers for more than a century. The stretch of the Tsangpo attempted by Walker and his team is the source of the legend of Shangri-la, and the model for James Hiltons novel, Lost Horizons. CONTROVERSY OVER THE 'DISCOVERY' OF TSANGPO'S HIDDEN FALLS: In 1924 British explorer Frank Kingdon-Ward observed what he believed to be the highest waterfall on the Tsangpo, a waterfall to rival Niagra. His observations led to a race to document these falls, which has attracted generations of explorers.FILM TIE-IN: The Walker expedition is the subject of a National Geographic Explorer special that will re-air at the time of publication. In 1926 botanist F. Kingdon Ward described one of modern explorationIs greatest challengesUtracking the course of the Tsangpo River of Tibet. In a mysterious region called Pemako, the Land of Flowers, the mighty Tsangpo loops around the eastern anchor of the Himalayan Range, cutting the deepest canyon on earth and emerging more than nine thousand feet lower on the plains of Assam, India, renamed the Brahmaputra. He and others added pieces to the puzzle he called Ithe riddle of the Tsangpo gorges, O but no one has yet followed the river throughout its course. For almost four decades on several continents, a small group of American companionsUWick Walker, Tom and Jamie McEwan, and Doug Gordon were privileged to participate in the emergence of a new and thrilling sport, whitewater racing. Moving from World Cup and Olympic levels to expeditions around the globe, Wick Walker and his companions were drawn to an area of Tibet where the highest and deepest of the EarthIs recesses come together.Perhaps no place in the world is more dramatic (or less known and explored) than the magnificent series of gorges that lie in far southeastern Tibet. In late September 1998, after years of planning, including a month-long reconnaissance into the gorge in 1997, and garnering support from the National Geographic Society, Malden Mills Industries, and a host of other sponsors, the expedition finally launched into the treacherous gorges for a first descent. Four whitewater paddlers, perhaps the best possible team in the world, would descend the Tsangpo, supported and resupplied at intervals by a team of four trekkers accompanied by two sherpas, local guides and porters, and a videographer from National Geographic. The descent, which began with difficultiesUa huge river swollen by a season of Ififty-year floodsO ended in tragedy with the death of renowned chemist and Olympian, Doug Gordon, who perished on October 16th while running a small put powerful waterfall. Although his teammates searched for his body for four days, his remains were never found, vanishing into the treacherous waters. The expedition was immediately abandoned.Courting the Diamond Sow is a compelling expedition account shaped by the first-hand diary accounts of the kayackers as they passed through the gorges; the history of this mysterious corner of the world some refer to as Shangri La and the attempts to explore it; and a cultural profile of this remote Tibetan region.
ISBN
9780792264217
By
Walker, Wickliffe W
Publisher
National Geographic
Item Condition
Used, Very Good
About This Product
Clean, unmarked copy with some edge wear. Good binding. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
1119248
Location
F
Salt Tide: Currents of Nature and Life on the Virginia Coast
$5.41
Description
Join naturalist Curtis J. Badger as he explores the last unspoiled barrier island ecosystem in the eastern United States. Badger's own ancestral roots in the region reach back into the 1600s, a legacy that fuels his passion and appreciation for this fragile confluence of land and sea. A beaded chain of 18 islands separates the inland shore from the Atlantic, and in this zone of protected waters lives a startling array of plants and animals. As he writes about looking for milky ribbon worms in the mudflats or paddling through spartina on a tidal creek, Badger gracefully weaves together personal history and natural science with insight and intelligence. 20 black & white illustrations.
ISBN
9780881504637
By
Badger, Curtis J
Publisher
Countryman Press
Item Condition
Used, Very Good
About This Product
Clean, unmarked copy with some edge wear. Good binding. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
1118707
Location
F
The Gift of Rivers: True Stories of Life on the Water (Travelers' Tales Guides)
$5.08
Description
Rushing, rolling, flowing rivers provide the ultimate metaphor for movement. They carve borders, create livelihoods, provoke adventure, and offer healing. From white-knuckle rafting rides to fishing stories to eco-essays, this collection by top authors explores the historical, practical, and spiritual significance of rivers. Contributors to The Gift of Rivers include Isabel Allende, Barry Lopez, Wendell Berry, Jan Morris, William Least Heat-Moon, Richard Bangs, Simon Winchester, and many other distinguished and emerging voices all celebrating rivers, literally and symbolically. A thoughtful introduction by former U.S. Poet Laureate Robert Hass describes the way in which rivers have fueled the imagination and spawned cultures since the beginning of time."
ISBN
9781885211422
Publisher
Travelers' Tales
Item Condition
Used, Very Good
About This Product
Clean, unmarked copy with some edge wear. Good binding. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
1111796
Location
L
From the Bottom Up: One Man's Crusade to Clean America's Rivers
$5.87
Description
Chad Pregracke was a high school student when he first glimpsed the trash that littered the bottom of the Mississippi, a shocking sight that launched him on a quest to clean up the river. After four discouraging years seeking government help without success, he decided to take his fund-raising private-- and a corporate sponsor decided to take a chance on this naive but unshakably determined young man. Ten years later Chad's one-man project has grown into a $500,000 operation with more than 60 sponsors (including National Geographic). His work has been featured on national news and won numerous honors and accolades, but its grassroots, can-do spirit still thrives aboard the 135-foot barge that serves as home base for his organization, a floating environmental classroom, and an inspiration to people of all ages. This is the story of his personal triumph as an advocate for America's rivers. Chad measures success in tons of garbage removed and thousands of people with a new stake in-- and a new understanding of-- the river environment. But From the Bottom Up is much more as well: a first-person chronicle of Chad's own life along the Mississippi featuring colorful characters, a near-death experience, a haunted swamp, and other flourishes worthy of a modern Mark Twain; and a fascinating portrait of the river itself which explores everything from the natural history of mussels and catfish to Indian lore to the key role of the Mississippi in our country's history.
ISBN
9781426201004
By
Pregracke, Chad
Publisher
National Geographic
Item Condition
Used, Very Good
About This Product
Clean, unmarked copy with some edge wear. Good binding. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
1111450
Location
C
The Beach: The History of Paradise on Earth
$6.74
Description
As dazzling and seductive as the landscape it celebrates, here's the first book to tell the story of the beach -- its history, customs, spectacles, and scandals

Blue-green surf, pillowy white sand, and a warm salty breeze -- when it comes to restoring body and soul, no place in the world can compete with the beach. Nature's most potent antidepressant, the seashore is today -- but wasn't always -- everyone's favorite getaway spot. With an entertaining historical account as its narrative framework, this elegantly designed volume charts the evolution of the seaside from a wasteland at the margins of civilization -- remote, terror filled, and exotic -- to its present role as the central staging ground for diversions of all sorts: escape, re-creation, and congregation. A marvelous selection of images evokes the beach's hypnotic appeal -- everything from impressionist paintings and fascinating lithographs to archival photographs and quirky advertising art -- as the text explores the histories of sexuality, fashion, and sport; the rise of great resorts from Coney Island to Cap d'Antibes; and the evolution of leisure itself. Also included is an appendix of the world's most beautiful, luxurious, and unspoiled beaches. The Beach will be a pleasure to any reader who loves to settle down on the sand with a great -- and fascinating -- book.

ISBN
9780670880959
By
Bosker, Gideon
Publisher
Viking Adult
Item Condition
Used, Good
About This Product
Moderate edge wear. Binding good. May have marking in text. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We sometimes source from libraries. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
742256
Location
D
The Narrow Edge: A Tiny Bird, an Ancient Crab, and an Epic Journey
$5.87
Description
In a volume as urgent and eloquent as Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, this book--winner of the Southern Environmental Law Center's 2016 Reed Environmental Writing Award in the book category--reveals how the health and well-being of a tiny bird and an ancient crab mirrors our own
Winner of the 2016 Rachel Carson Environment Book Award given by the Society of Environmental Journalists
Each year, red knots, sandpipers weighing no more than a coffee cup, fly a near-miraculous 19,000 miles from the tip of South America to their nesting grounds in the Arctic and back. Along the way, they double their weight by gorging on millions of tiny horseshoe crab eggs. Horseshoe crabs, ancient animals that come ashore but once a year, are vital to humans, too: their blue blood safeguards our health. Now, the rufa red knot, newly listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, will likely face extinction in the foreseeable future across its entire range, 40 states and 27 countries. The first United States bird listed because global warming imperils its existence, it will not be the last: the red knot is the twenty-first century's "canary in the coal mine." Logging thousands of miles following the knots, shivering with the birds out on the snowy tundra, tracking them down in bug-infested marshes, Cramer vividly portrays what's at stake for millions of shorebirds and hundreds of millions of people living at the sea edge. The Narrow Edge offers an uplifting portrait of the tenacity of tiny birds and of the many people who, on the sea edge we all share, keep knots flying and offer them safe harbor. Winner of the 2016 National Academies Communications Award for best book that honors the best in science communications. Sponsored by the Keck Futures Initiative--a program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, with the support of the W.M. Keck Foundation
ISBN
9780300185195
By
Cramer, Deborah
Publisher
Yale University Press
Item Condition
Used, Very Good
About This Product
Clean, unmarked copy with some edge wear. Good binding. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
741283
Location
D
Wild Sea: A History of the Southern Ocean
$28.00
Description
"The Southern Ocean is a wild and elusive place, an ocean like no other. With its waters lying between the Antarctic continent and the southern coastlines of Australia, New Zealand, South America, and South Africa, it is the most remote and inaccessible part of the planetary ocean, the only part that flows around Earth unimpeded by any landmass. It is notorious amongst sailors for its tempestuous winds and hazardous fog and ice. Yet it is a difficult ocean to pin down. Its southern boundary, defined by the icy continent of Antarctica, is constantly moving in a seasonal dance of freeze and thaw. To the north, its waters meet and mingle with those of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans along a fluid boundary that defies the neat lines of a cartographer."

So begins Joy McCann's Wild Sea, the remarkable story of the world's remote Southern, or Antarctic, Ocean. Unlike the Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, and Arctic Oceans with their long maritime histories, little is known about the Southern Ocean. This book takes readers beyond the familiar heroic narratives of polar exploration to explore the nature of this stormy circumpolar ocean and its place in Western and Indigenous histories. Drawing from a vast archive of charts and maps, sea captains' journals, whalers' log books, missionaries' correspondence, voyagers' letters, scientific reports, stories, myths, and her own experiences, McCann embarks on a voyage of discovery across its surfaces and into its depths, revealing its distinctive physical and biological processes as well as the people, species, events, and ideas that have shaped our perceptions of it. The result is both a global story of changing scientific knowledge about oceans and their vulnerability to human actions and a local one, showing how the Southern Ocean has defined and sustained southern environments and people over time.

Beautifully and powerfully written, Wild Sea will raise a broader awareness and appreciation of the natural and cultural history of this little-known ocean and its emerging importance as a barometer of planetary climate change.
ISBN
9780226622385
By
McCann, Joy
Publisher
University of Chicago Press
Item Condition
New
About This Product
New from publisher.
Item SKU
9780226622385
Location
History
Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore
$16.00
Description
FINALIST FOR THE PULITZER PRIZE IN GENERAL NONFICTION
WINNER OF THE NATIONAL OUTDOOR BOOK AWARD
A CHICAGO TRIBUNE TOP TEN BOOK OF 2018
A GUARDIAN, NPR's SCIENCE FRIDAY, PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, AND LIBRARY JOURNAL BEST BOOK OF 2018

Hailed as "deeply felt" (New York Times), "a revelation" (Pacific Standard), and "the book on climate change and sea levels that was missing" (Chicago Tribune), Rising is both a highly original work of lyric reportage and a haunting meditation on how to let go of the places we love.

With every passing day, and every record-breaking hurricane, it grows clearer that climate change is neither imagined nor distant--and that rising seas are transforming the coastline of the United States in irrevocable ways. In Rising, Elizabeth Rush guides readers through some of the places where this change has been most dramatic, from the Gulf Coast to Miami, and from New York City to the Bay Area. For many of the plants, animals, and humans in these places, the options are stark: retreat or perish in place.

Weaving firsthand testimonials from those facing this choice--a Staten Islander who lost her father during Sandy, the remaining holdouts of a Native American community on a drowning Isle de Jean Charles, a neighborhood in Pensacola settled by escaped slaves hundreds of years ago--with profiles of wildlife biologists, activists, and other members of these vulnerable communities, Rising privileges the voices of those too often kept at the margins.

In a new afterword for the paperback edition, Rush highlights questions of storytelling, adaptability, and how to powerfully shift conversation around ongoing climate change--including the storms of 2017 and 2018: Hurricanes Harvey, Maria, Irma, Florence, and Michael.

ISBN
9781571313812
By
Rush, Elizabeth
Publisher
Milkweed Editions
Item Condition
New
About This Product
New from publisher.
Item SKU
9781571313812
Location
Science
The Boiling River: Adventure and Discovery in the Amazon (TED Books)
$5.81
Description
In this exciting adventure mixed with amazing scientific study, a young, exuberant explorer and geoscientist journeys deep into the Amazon--where rivers boil and legends come to life.

When Andrés Ruzo was just a small boy in Peru, his grandfather told him the story of a mysterious legend: There is a river, deep in the Amazon, which boils as if a fire burns below it. Twelve years later, Ruzo--now a geoscientist--hears his aunt mention that she herself had visited this strange river.

Determined to discover if the boiling river is real, Ruzo sets out on a journey deep into the Amazon. What he finds astounds him: In this long, wide, and winding river, the waters run so hot that locals brew tea in them; small animals that fall in are instantly cooked. As he studies the river, Ruzo faces challenges more complex than he had ever imaged.

The Boiling River follows this young explorer as he navigates a tangle of competing interests--local shamans, illegal cattle farmers and loggers, and oil companies. This true account reads like a modern-day adventure, complete with extraordinary characters, captivating plot twists, and jaw-dropping details--including stunning photographs and a never-before-published account about this incredible natural wonder. Ultimately, though, The Boiling River is about a man trying to understand the moral obligation that comes with scientific discovery --to protect a sacred site from misuse, neglect, and even from his own discovery.

ISBN
9781501119477
By
Ruzo, Andres
Publisher
Simon & Schuster/ TED
Item Condition
Used, Like New
About This Product
Excellent, unmarked copy with little wear and tight binding. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
705515
Location
B
Landfill: Notes on Gull Watching and Trash Picking in the Anthropocene
$25.00
Description

Over the past hundred years, gulls have been brought ashore by modernity. They now live not only on the coasts but in our slipstream following trawlers, barges, and garbage trucks. They are more our contemporaries than most birds, living their wild lives among us in towns and cities. In many ways they live as we do, walking the built-up world and grabbing a bite where they can. Yet this disturbs us. We've started fearing gulls for getting good at being among us. We see them as scavengers, not entrepreneurs; ocean-going aliens, not refugees. They are too big for the world they have entered. Their story is our story too.

Landfill is the original and compelling story of how in the Anthropocene we have learned about the natural world, named and catalogued it, and then colonized it, planted it, or filled it with our junk. While most other birds have gone in the opposite direction, hiding away from us, some vanishing forever, gulls continue to tell us how the wild can share our world. For these reasons Landfill is the nature book for our times, groundbreaking and genre-bending. Without nostalgia or eulogy, it kicks beneath the littered surface of the things to discover stranger truths.

ISBN
9781603589093
By
Dee, Tim
Publisher
Chelsea Green Publishing
Item Condition
New
About This Product
New from publisher.
Item SKU
9781603589093
Location
Non-Fiction
Seaweed Chronicles: A World at the Water?s Edge
$24.95
Description
"You might not expect unfettered passion on the topic of seaweed, but Shetterly is such a great storyteller that you find yourself following along eagerly." --Mark Kurlansky

"Seaweed is ancient and basic, a testament to the tenacious beginnings of life on earth," writes Susan Hand Shetterly in this elegant, fascinating book. "Why wouldn't seaweeds be a protean life source for the lives that have evolved since?" On a planet facing environmental change and diminishing natural resources, seaweed is increasingly important as a source of food and as a fundamental part of our global ecosystem.

In Seaweed Chronicles, Shetterly takes readers deep into the world of this essential organism by providing an immersive, often poetic look at life on the rugged shores of her beloved Gulf of Maine, where the growth and harvesting of seaweed is becoming a major industry. While examining the life cycle of seaweed and its place in the environment, she tells the stories of the men and women who farm and harvest it--and who are fighting to protect this critical species against forces both natural and man-made. Ideal for readers of such books as The Hidden Life of Trees and How to Read Water, Seaweed Chronicles is a deeply informative look at a little understood and too often unappreciated part of our habitat.
ISBN
9781616205744
By
Shetterly, Susan Hand
Publisher
Algonquin Books
Item Condition
New
About This Product
New from publisher.
Item SKU
9781616205744
Location
Nature
Trout Tips: More than 250 fly-fishing tips from the members of Trout Unlimited
$7.72
Description
Whether you're a beginning angler looking to get into the sport or an experienced fly fisherman wanting to hone your skills, Trout Tips from the co-author of The Little Red Book of Fly Fishing is sure to provide you with tips, tactics, and techniques that will make you a better angler.

From the mighty rivers of the Pacific Northwest, to the rolling streams of New England, to the freestone streams of the Appalachians, to the frigid waters of Canada, fly fishing is a sport embraced by anglers from all corners of North America. And now from the members of the highly respected conservation organization Trout Unlimited comes a comprehensive volume of tested tips and tactics for flyfishermen from every region and of every skill level. Trout Tips covers every aspect of fly fishing:

  • Learn how to select the rod, reel, and fly line that are best suited for your type of fishing.
  • Perfect your casting techniques so you can place your dry fly, nymph, wet fly, or streamer exactly where you want it to be.
  • Get a proper drift over likely holding areas.
  • Learn how to tie your own flies

  • It's easy with the tips from TU's tiers. Want to know how to read water, no matter what the conditions? Look no further than this book. Here you'll find chapters featuring these tips, plus advice on wading, fighting fish, and tying bombproof knots, and much more in this compact and insightful book.

    Skyhorse Publishing is proud to publish a broad range of books for fishermen. Our books for anglers include titles that focus on fly fishing, bait fishing, fly-casting, spin casting, deep sea fishing, and surf fishing. Our books offer both practical advice on tackle, techniques, knots, and more, as well as lyrical prose on fishing for bass, trout, salmon, crappie, baitfish, catfish, and more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to publishing books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked by other publishers and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

    ISBN
    9781510713703
    Publisher
    Skyhorse
    Item Condition
    Used, Very Good
    About This Product
    Clean, unmarked copy with some edge wear. Good binding. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
    Item SKU
    1107091
    Location
    B
    Ducks: A Field Guide to Familiar North American Species (Pocket Naturalist Guide Series)
    $11.89
    Description
    Almost everyone recognizes the mallard duck but can you tell a Shoveler from a Pintail? Ducks is the must-have, reference guide to help identify these web footed swimmers. Whether you're on a nature hike or in your own backyard, you'll want to have a copy of this richly illustrated folding guide that features beautiful color illustrations of most North American species at rest and in flight. Laminated for durability, this handy guide is made to fit into a pocket or backpack.
    ISBN
    9781583552391
    By
    Press, Waterford
    Publisher
    Waterford Press
    Item Condition
    Used, Very Good
    About This Product
    Clean, unmarked copy with some edge wear. Good binding. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
    Item SKU
    707481
    Location
    B
    The Last Whalers: Three Years in the Far Pacific with a Courageous Tribe and a Vanishing Way of Life
    $18.99
    Description
    A New York Times Notable Book and Finalist for the Lowell Thomas Travel Journalism Best Travel Book Award

    In this "immersive, densely reported, and altogether remarkable first book [with] the texture and color of a first-rate novel" (New York Times), journalist Doug Bock Clark tells the epic story of the world's last subsistence whalers and the threats posed to a tribe on the brink.
    "An amazing account . . . Spectacular and deeply empathetic." --Sebastian Junger, The Perfect Storm. "A monumental achievement." --Mitchell Zuckoff, 13 Hours. "A true work of art . . . Lyrically written and richly observed." --Michael Finkel, The Stranger in the Woods. "An extraordinary feat of reportage and illumination." --Leslie Jamison, The Empathy Exams. "Remarkable, gorgeously written." --Bronwen Dickey, Pit Bull.
    On a volcanic island in the Savu Sea so remote that other Indonesians call it "The Land Left Behind" live the Lamalerans: a tribe of 1,500 hunter-gatherers who are the world's last subsistence whalers. They have survived for half a millennium by hunting whales with bamboo harpoons and handmade wooden boats powered by sails of woven palm fronds. But now, under assault from the rapacious forces of the modern era and a global economy, their way of life teeters on the brink of collapse.
    Award-winning journalist Doug Bock Clark, one of a handful of Westerners who speak the Lamaleran language, lived with the tribe across three years, and he brings their world and their people to vivid life in this gripping story of a vanishing culture. Jon, an orphaned apprentice whaler, toils to earn his harpoon and provide for his ailing grandparents, while Ika, his indomitable younger sister, is eager to forge a life unconstrained by tradition, and to realize a star-crossed love. Frans, an aging shaman, tries to unite the tribe in order to undo a deadly curse. And Ignatius, a legendary harpooner entering retirement, labors to hand down the Ways of the Ancestors to his son, Ben, who would secretly rather become a DJ in the distant tourist mecca of Bali.
    Deeply empathetic and richly reported, The Last Whalers is a riveting, powerful chronicle of the collision between one of the planet's dwindling indigenous peoples and the irresistible enticements and upheavals of a rapidly transforming world.
    ISBN
    9780316390613
    By
    Clark, Doug Bock
    Publisher
    Back Bay Books
    Item Condition
    New
    About This Product
    New from publisher.
    Item SKU
    9780316390613
    Location
    Non-Fiction
    A Desert Harvest: New and Selected Essays
    $26.00
    Description

    A career-spanning collection of Bruce Berger's beautiful, subtle, and spiky essays on the American desert

    Occupying a space between traditional nature writing, memoir, journalism, and prose poetry, Bruce Berger's essays are beautiful, subtle, and haunting meditations on the landscape and culture of the American Southwest. Combining new, unpublished essays with selections from his acclaimed trilogy of "desert books"--The Telling Distance, There Was a River, and Almost an Island--A Desert Harvest is a career-spanning selection of the best work by this unique and undervalued voice.

    Wasteland architecture, mountaintop astronomy, Bach in the wilderness, the mind of the wood rat, the canals of Phoenix, and the numerous eccentric personalities who call the desert their home all come to life in these fascinating portraits of America's seemingly desolate terrains.

    ISBN
    9780374220570
    By
    Berger, Bruce
    Publisher
    Farrar, Straus and Giroux
    Item Condition
    New
    About This Product
    New from publisher.
    Item SKU
    9780374220570
    Location
    Nature