Products

She Has Her Mother's Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity
$20.00
Description
2019 PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award Finalist
"Science book of the year"--The Guardian

One of New York Times 100 Notable Books for 2018
One of Publishers Weekly's Top Ten Books of 2018
One of Kirkus's Best Books of 2018
One of Mental Floss's Best Books of 2018
One of Science Friday's Best Science Books of 2018

"Extraordinary"--New York Times Book Review
"Magisterial"--The Atlantic
"Engrossing"--
Wired
"Leading contender as the most outstanding nonfiction work of the year"--
Minneapolis Star-Tribune

Celebrated New York Times columnist and science writer Carl Zimmer presents a profoundly original perspective on what we pass along from generation to generation. Charles Darwin played a crucial part in turning heredity into a scientific question, and yet he failed spectacularly to answer it. The birth of genetics in the early 1900s seemed to do precisely that. Gradually, people translated their old notions about heredity into a language of genes. As the technology for studying genes became cheaper, millions of people ordered genetic tests to link themselves to missing parents, to distant ancestors, to ethnic identities...

But, Zimmer writes, "Each of us carries an amalgam of fragments of DNA, stitched together from some of our many ancestors. Each piece has its own ancestry, traveling a different path back through human history. A particular fragment may sometimes be cause for worry, but most of our DNA influences who we are--our appearance, our height, our penchants--in inconceivably subtle ways." Heredity isn't just about genes that pass from parent to child. Heredity continues within our own bodies, as a single cell gives rise to trillions of cells that make up our bodies. We say we inherit genes from our ancestors--using a word that once referred to kingdoms and estates--but we inherit other things that matter as much or more to our lives, from microbes to technologies we use to make life more comfortable. We need a new definition of what heredity is and, through Carl Zimmer's lucid exposition and storytelling, this resounding tour de force delivers it.

Weaving historical and current scientific research, his own experience with his two daughters, and the kind of original reporting expected of one of the world's best science journalists, Zimmer ultimately unpacks urgent bioethical quandaries arising from new biomedical technologies, but also long-standing presumptions about who we really are and what we can pass on to future generations.

ISBN
9781101984611
By
Zimmer, Carl
Publisher
Dutton
Item Condition
New
About This Product
New from publisher.
Item SKU
9781101984611
Location
Science
The Tangled Tree: A Radical New History of Life
$18.00
Description
In this New York Times bestseller and longlist nominee for the National Book Award, "our greatest living chronicler of the natural world" (The New York Times), David Quammen explains how recent discoveries in molecular biology affect our understanding of evolution and life's history.

In the mid-1970s, scientists began using DNA sequences to reexamine the history of all life. Perhaps the most startling discovery to come out of this new field--the study of life's diversity and relatedness at the molecular level--is horizontal gene transfer (HGT), or the movement of genes across species lines. It turns out that HGT has been widespread and important; we now know that roughly eight percent of the human genome arrived sideways by viral infection--a type of HGT.

In The Tangled Tree, "the grandest tale in biology....David Quammen presents the science--and the scientists involved--with patience, candor, and flair" (Nature). We learn about the major players, such as Carl Woese, the most important little-known biologist of the twentieth century; Lynn Margulis, the notorious maverick whose wild ideas about "mosaic" creatures proved to be true; and Tsutomu Wantanabe, who discovered that the scourge of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is a direct result of horizontal gene transfer, bringing the deep study of genome histories to bear on a global crisis in public health.

"David Quammen proves to be an immensely well-informed guide to a complex story" (The Wall Street Journal). In The Tangled Tree, he explains how molecular studies of evolution have brought startling recognitions about the tangled tree of life--including where we humans fit upon it. Thanks to new technologies, we now have the ability to alter even our genetic composition--through sideways insertions, as nature has long been doing. "The Tangled Tree is a source of wonder....Quammen has written a deep and daring intellectual adventure" (The Boston Globe).

ISBN
9781476776637
By
Quammen, David
Publisher
Simon & Schuster
Item Condition
New
About This Product
New from publisher.
Item SKU
9781476776637
Location
Science
Genetic Engineering: The Hazards Vedic Engineering: The Solutions: Health - Agriculture - The Environment
$11.35
ISBN
9780923569181
By
Fagan, John
Publisher
Maharishi Univ of Management Pr
Item Condition
Used, Good
About This Product
Moderate edge wear. Binding good. May have marking in text. Dust jacket included if issued with one. We sometimes source from libraries. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
692697
Location
C
Genetic Justice: DNA Data Banks, Criminal Investigations, and Civil Liberties
$5.87
Description
National DNA databanks were initially established to catalogue the identities of violent criminals and sex offenders. However, since the mid-1990s, forensic DNA databanks have in some cases expanded to include people merely arrested, regardless of whether they've been charged or convicted of a crime. The public is largely unaware of these changes and the advances that biotechnology and forensic DNA science have made possible. Yet many citizens are beginning to realize that the unfettered collection of DNA profiles might compromise our basic freedoms and rights.

Two leading authors on medical ethics, science policy, and civil liberties take a hard look at how the United States has balanced the use of DNA technology, particularly the use of DNA databanks in criminal justice, with the privacy rights of its citizenry. Krimsky and Simoncelli analyze the constitutional, ethical, and sociopolitical implications of expanded DNA collection in the United States and compare these findings to trends in the United Kingdom, Japan, Australia, Germany, and Italy. They explore many controversial topics, including the legal precedent for taking DNA from juveniles, the search for possible family members of suspects in DNA databases, the launch of "DNA dragnets" among local populations, and the warrantless acquisition by police of so-called abandoned DNA in the search for suspects. Most intriguing, Krimsky and Simoncelli explode the myth that DNA profiling is infallible, which has profound implications for criminal justice.

ISBN
9780231145206
By
Simoncelli, Tania
Publisher
Columbia University Press
Item Condition
Used, Acceptable
About This Product
Reading copy with considerable wear. May have marking in text. Binding may be cracked; all pages present. Does not include dust jacket. We sometimes source from libraries. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
1120605
Location
D
Decoding Darkness: The Search For The Genetic Causes Of Alzheimer's Disease
$5.87
Description
For nearly a century the cause of Alzheimer's--as well as an effective treatment--has eluded scientists. But research over the past fifteen years has yielded enough knowledge about the disorder's culprit genes and proteins that today drug companies are vying to create a breakthrough drug. At the center of this research is Rudolph Tanzi, a savvy young neurogeneticist who played a key role in a landmark experiment that made disease genes identifiable. Decoding Darkness is the riveting story of his work and that of many others who have gradually pieced together an understanding of why Alzheimer's occurs.Dr. Tanzi and science writer Ann Parson take the reader into the day-to-day lives of those trying to conquer this dreaded disease. In the process, they offer an intimate view of high-stakes medical research, the molecular-genetics revolution that propels it, and the obstacles that threaten to derail it. As human trials for Alzheimer drugs based on one promising hypothesis begin, Decoding Darkness will give readers an unparalleled behind-the-scenes look at how we got here and where we're headed.
ISBN
9780738201955
By
Tanzi, Rudolph E
Publisher
Basic Books
Item Condition
Used, Like New
About This Product
Excellent, unmarked copy with little wear and tight binding. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
1100229
Location
D
The Selfish Gene (English and Korean Edition)
$29.44
Description
Korean edition of THE SELFISH GENE: 30th Anniversary New Edition --with a new Introduction by Richard Dawkins. It is first published in 1976 and is still a bestseller today for its lucid prose explaining the biology of evolution for layman. Translated by Hong Yeong Nam & Lee Sang Im. In Korean. Distributed by Tsai Fong Books, Inc.
ISBN
9788932471631
By
Dawkins, Richard
Publisher
Eulryu Munhwasa
Item Condition
Used, Like New
About This Product
Excellent, unmarked copy with little wear and tight binding. We ship in recyclable American-made mailers. 100% money-back guarantee on all orders.
Item SKU
708762
Location
B
The Lost Family: How DNA Testing is Upending Who We Are
$27.00
Description
A deeply reported look at the rise of home genetic testing and the seismic shock it has had on individual lives

You swab your cheek or spit into a vial, then send it away to a lab somewhere. Weeks later you get a report that might tell you where your ancestors came from or if you carry certain genetic risks. Or the report could reveal a long-buried family secret and upend your entire sense of identity. Soon a lark becomes an obsession, an incessant desire to find answers to questions at the core of your being, like "Who am I?" and "Where did I come from?" Welcome to the age of home genetic testing.

In The Lost Family, journalist Libby Copeland investigates what happens when we embark on a vast social experiment with little understanding of the ramifications. Copeland explores the culture of genealogy buffs, the science of DNA, and the business of companies like Ancestry and 23andMe, all while tracing the story of one woman, her unusual results, and a relentless methodical drive for answers that becomes a thoroughly modern genetic detective story.

The Lost Family delves into the many lives that have been irrevocably changed by home DNA tests--a technology that represents the end of family secrets. There are the adoptees who've used the tests to find their birth parents; donor-conceived adults who suddenly discover they have more than fifty siblings; hundreds of thousands of Americans who discover their fathers aren't biologically related to them, a phenomenon so common it is known as a "non-paternity event"; and individuals who are left to grapple with their conceptions of race and ethnicity when their true ancestral histories are discovered. Throughout these accounts, Copeland explores the impulse toward genetic essentialism and raises the question of how much our genes should get to tell us about who we are. With more than thirty million people having undergone home DNA testing, the answer to that question is more important than ever.

Gripping and masterfully told, The Lost Family is a spectacular book on a big, timely subject.

ISBN
9781419743009
By
Copeland, Libby
Publisher
Harry N. Abrams
Item Condition
New
About This Product
New from publisher.
Item SKU
9781419743009
Location
Science